Thinking globally, acting locally

In this age of information, the world is developing in a social, ecological and economical way at a pace never seen before. Humanity as a whole faces great challenges. Adopting a responsible approach towards the environment and resources is becoming a matter of survival and, today, sets the course for the prospects of coming generations.

Acting sustainably in order to survive globally

According to UN calculations, the population of the world at present is almost 7.2 billion people and is set to rise to 9.6 billion by 2050. As the population grows, the consumption of fossil energy sources and the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere increase continually. Based on estimations from numerous renowned scientists, this leads to a dramatic change in the climate with rising average temperatures. Even if the temperature rise is limited to two degrees Celsius compared with pre-industrial times, severe effects can be expected in individual regions around the world and on their populations. Migratory movements and increasingly aggressive altercations around water and comestible goods would be expected as a result. At the same time, natural resources and commodities would run short while energy costs would reach unknown levels. The rise in cost would be stoked by the energy revolution which, by 2020 at the latest, would lead to the amount of renewable energies in overall power consumption rising to at least 35 percent in Germany.

Even today, the use of natural resources far exceeds the earth's ability to regenerate. The consequences are devastating: Loss of ecosystem functions and biological diversity, degradation of the ground functionality and desertification as well as water shortage and water contamination.

Demographic change and shortage of specialists in Germany

The low birth rates in Germany result in a fall in the number of inhabitants despite immigration – at the same time, the average age of the population is increasing. According to a German government report on demography, the number of people living in Germany could fall to 65 million by 2060. Every third person is likely to be 65 or older. This would place immense challenges on the economy and society. Even today it is evident that there will be a shortage of specialists in the coming years with serious consequences. Companies compete against each other to head-hunt the best professionals and are under increasing pressure to offer attractive and integrative working conditions.

In the "CSR action plan" published in 2010, the German government encourages companies to voluntarily make a significant contribution towards sustainable overall development beyond the legislative requirements. The aim of the national strategy is to bring about a change in the awareness of the value of "Corporate Social Responsibility". The changed perception of the ecological and social demands of recent years influences markets and areas of industry. As such, the topic of sustainability has a considerable impact on a company's economical future.

Recognising and utilising our market challenges

In the interest of long-term success, Piepenbrock is incorporating the three dimensions of sustainability much more strongly in its strategy and corporate processes. The company thereby heeds the advice of the German government to not only fulfil the legislative requirements but also meet the requirements of corporate responsibility. The Piepenbrock Group constantly faces new market demands in the area of services and also special machinery construction. The pressure from competition around the world is increasing. Customers expect quality, good value for money and compliance with CSR standards.

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Potential in the provision of services

Facility management represents enormous potential to save resources. In Germany alone, the industry has an estimated market volume of 176 billion euros. Almost half of the energy consumed in the Federal Republic is used to heat and service buildings. This means that real estate is among the main culprits of carbon dioxide emissions. With their partners, service providers are obliged to develop innovative implementation concepts. At the forefront here is the sensible use of resources from an ecological and economical standpoint, the development of energy management systems, the implementation of waste and water management as well as the use of environmentally-friendly cleaning techniques and methods.

In terms of contract cleaning it is above all the frequency of cleaning that makes an impact on the environment. Decisive factors are the applied methods and techniques, which lead to a reduction in the cleaning agents or dispenses with them entirely. The choice of energy and water-saving cleaning methods can reduce negative impacts on the ecosystem.


Innovation pressure in industry

In the area of machinery and plant construction, the importance of efficiency and environmentally-friendly technologies is increasing. Major clients, in particular, place higher demands on the sustainability of packaging and machines. To ensure that machines with low consumption and low emissions are available to the customer reliably, securely and in the long-term, innovative solutions and efficient production processes are necessary. As an example, the Piepenbrock subsidiaries LoeschPack and Hastamat have been offering the first carbon dioxide-neutral machines on the market since 2012 under the "carbon neutral packaging" seal of approval. Since then they have been offsetting CO2 emissions emitted within the value chain via climate protection projects.


Innovation pressure in industry

In the area of machinery and plant construction, the importance of efficiency and environmentally-friendly technologies is increasing. Major clients, in particular, place higher demands on the sustainability of packaging and machines. To ensure that machines with low consumption and low emissions are available to the customer reliably, securely and in the long-term, innovative solutions and efficient production processes are necessary. As an example, the Piepenbrock subsidiaries LoeschPack and Hastamat have been offering the first carbon dioxide-neutral machines on the market since 2012 under the "carbon neutral packaging" seal of approval. Since then they have been offsetting CO2 emissions emitted within the value chain via climate protection projects.